50 South Main Street, Doylestown, PA 18901
Call: 215-348-3334
innkeeper@hargravehouse.net
 

Archibald Crawford owned the large parcel of land around the crossroads for about 15 years. Around 1768, he sold a 10-acre parcel to brothers Robert and Henry Magill, recent Scot-Irish immigrants.

The Magill brothers operated a mercantile business at the southwest corner of the crossroads opposite Doyle’s Tavern. In 1776, Henry retired and moved to a farm in Bedminster. He transferred his ownership of the land to his brother, who became sole owner of this parcel.

In 1782, Robert died without a will, leaving behind a wife and one child, William Magill. Young William was only 7 years old when his father died, but his father had requested that his only son be educated and apprenticed to a trade. William apprenticed as a clockmaker and followed that trade for many years, manufacturing large, old-fashioned clocks. He spent his boyhood living with his mother and her new husband, Jacob Troxel, by the crossroads. His education was provided by itinerant schoolmasters and local teachers. As he grew into a young man, he operated his mother’s hotel, The Mansion House, at what would later be State and Main Streets (where Paper Unicorn is today).

William married, had five children, and enlisted in the military service during the War of 1812. He became a captain in a unit known as the Buck County Rangers. He continued as an officer in the militia until his death.

The little crossroads was beginning to grow into a small village. The first stagecoach route between Philadelphia and Easton was established, running directly through the village. The 62-mile trip took 1½ days. In 1813, the county seat was moved from Newtown to the crossroads.

Three streets in the new village were named for the members of the Magill family: Mary Street, Louisa Street and Arabella Street. (Arabella Street eventually became most of what Hamilton Street is now, with the remaining portion becoming Arabella Alley. That’s the current entrance to Hargrave House’s parking lot.) William Magill died in 1824. He had no will.

Posted : July 7, 2014